“Stickman’s Tips for Having a Table at a Comic Book Convention” was originally created in 2011 as part of the “24 Hour Comic Challenge.” Since then it has become a popular resource for all sorts of creative professionals and folks who rely on showing their goods and services at any type of convention. I’m very pleased with the positive reaction it has received. You’ll find more history and links related to my entry at the bottom of the page.


page 1
The Lost Son of Solomon Page One
page 2
The Lost Son of Solomon Page Two

Page 3
The Lost Son of Solomon Page Three

Page 4
 The Lost Son of Solomon Page Four

Page 5
 The Lost Son of Solomon Page Five

Page 6
 The Lost Son of Solomon Page Six

Page 7
 The Lost Son of Solomon Page Six

Page 8
 The Lost Son of Solomon Page Seven

Page 9
 The Lost Son of Solomon Page Eight

Page 10
 The Lost Son of Solomon Page NinePage 11
 The Lost Son of Solomon Page Ten

Page 12 The Lost Son of Solomon Page Twelve

Page 13
 The Lost Son of Solomon Page Fourteen

Page 14
 The Lost Son of Solomon Page Thirteen

Page 15 The Lost Son of Solomon Page Thirteen

Page 16
 The Lost Son of Solomon Page sixteen

Page 17
 The Lost Son of Solomon Page Seventeen

Page 18 The Lost Son of Solomon Page Seventeen

Page 19 The Lost Son of Solomon Page Seventeen

Page 20 The Lost Son of Solomon Page Seventeen

Page 21 The Lost Son of Solomon Page Seventeen

Page 22 The Lost Son of Solomon Page Seventeen

Page 23 The Lost Son of Solomon Page Seventeen

Page 24 The Lost Son of Solomon Page Seventeen



©2011 Mark Monlux "Stickman's Tips for having a Table at a Comic Book Convention"

If you would like to link to this page, please use http://bit.ly/1jb8a53 so that I might follow the traffic.

Follow Me

 

24 Hour Comic Challenge 2011

I’m Mark Monlux, a full-time freelance illustrator since 1985. Along with my commercial work with clients, I produce two web comics, The Comic Critic  and The Return of Stickman.

Comic Book Ink in Lakewood, Washington hosted the 24 Hour Comic Challenge in 2011. Attending for their third year were members of The CLAW. This was my fifth challenge. Although I’d completed the first two, I fell short by a few pages on the third. I was determined to complete this one the same way I did the fourth — in glory. Those from the earlier events are here: One, Two, Three and Four.

Armed with a couple of story ideas, I arrived at Comic Book Ink ready to go. Then a number of folks asked me if I was going to do another instructional comic. That idea wasn’t as solid, but I decided to go with it, spending the next seven hours firming up a script. Of course, that meant that there were only 17 hours left. Working against the clock, I realized that the only way I’d finish  in time was to draw stick figures. My strip, The Return of Stickman, has shown over the years that stick figures can easily describe the same point just as more laboriously drawn cartoons.

My friend James Stowe grumbled at my choice. Every year, we have a gentlemen's bet on which of us will be done first. I was still terribly behind at 2 a.m. and had huge concerns about even finishing the strip on time. Since I’m a morning person, I was able to rally during those bleak, early hours. And I was as shocked as everybody else to find myself finishing early, within a minute after Stowe. It’s still my goal to beat Stowe at the next 24 Hour Comic Challenge.

The CLAW uses the 24 Hour Comic Challenge as an opportunity to solicit contributions for its Student Scholarship Fund. To that end, several cartoonists drew thematic trading cards; in this case, the theme was Halloween Costumes or Monsters. The cards were then placed into brown paper bags for a blind selection by anyone who contributed at least $5.00.

If you enjoyed this stickman strip, you will love my ongoing strip: The Return of Stickman. You can see the other comics I have drawn for the 24 Hour Comic Challenge here. If your just starting your career in illustration and want professional business tips relating to pricing and contract negotiation, check out this link.